About

This project addresses the need to have greater knowledge of how to design scalable and reliable solutions for research information and data curation by examining researchers’ perceived value of research information and data services; motivations to participate in and commit to online research information management systems, and contribute to research information curation.
Accurate research identity identification and determination are essential for effective grouping, linking, aggregation, and retrieval of digital scholarship; evaluation of the research productivity and impact of individuals, groups, and institutions; and identification of expertise and skills. The reliability and scalability of those services will be critical to the success of national, distributed, digital information infrastructure of research information management. There are many different research identity management systems, often referred to as research information management (RIM) or current research information systems (CRIS), from publishers, libraries, universities, search engines and content aggregators with different data models, coverage, and quality. Although knowledge curation by professionals usually produces the highest quality results, it may not be scalable because of its high cost. The literature on online communities shows that successful peer curation communities which are able to attract and retain enough participants can provide scalable knowledge curation solutions of a quality that is comparable to the quality of professionally curated content. Hence, the success of online RIM systems may depend on the number of contributors and users they are able to recruit, motivate, and engage in research information curation.
The outcomes of this exploratory research include but not be limited to a qualitative theory of research identity data and information practices of researchers, quantitative model(s) of researchers’ priorities for different online RIM services, the factors that may affect their participation in and commitment to online RIM systems, and their motivations to engage in RIM. The study’s findings can enhance our knowledge of the design of research identity data/metadata models, services, quality assurance activities, and, mechanisms for recruiting and retaining researchers for provision and maintenance of identity data. Design recommendations based on this study can be adopted in diverse settings and can produce improved services for multiple stakeholders of research identity data such as researchers, librarians, students, university administrators, funding agencies, government, publishers, search engines, and the general public.

Publications

Refereed Journal Articles

Presentations

Invited Presentations

  • Stvilia, B., Wu, S., & Lee, D. J. (February, 2019). Current Research – EFS Community Building. Panel presentation given at Expert Finder Systems National Forum 2019, Expert Finder Systems National Forum, Orlando, Florida.
  • Wu, S., Stvilia, B., & Lee, D. J. (2018, January). Engaging researchers in research identity data curation: An exploratory study. Delivered at The University of Hong Kong.
  • Wu, S, Stvilia, B., & Lee, D. J. (2017, March). Users and uses of research information management systems: Readers, record managers, and community members. Delivered at School of Information Management, Sun Yat-Sen University, China.
  • Stvilia, B., Wu, S., & Lee, D. J. (presented 2017, January). Users and uses of research information management systems: Readers, record Managers, and community members. Presentation at ALISE 2017 Annual Conference, ALISE, Atlanta, Georgia.

Refereed Presentations at Conferences

  • Lee, D. J., Stvilia, B., & Wu, S. (presented 2017, October). Practices of metadata use in research information management systems. Poster presentation at 2017 Annual Meeting of the Association for Information Science and Technology, ASIS&T.
  • Wu, S., Stvilia, B., & Lee, D. J. (presented 2017, October). How do Chinese researchers use research information management systems: An exploratory study. Poster presentation at 2017 Annual Meeting of the Association for Information Science and Technology, ASIS&T.
  • Wu, S., Lee, D. J., & Stvilia, B. (presented 2017, August). Engaging researchers in research information management systems. Presentation at VIVO Conference 2017, VIVO.
  • Lee, D. J., Stvilia, B., & Wu, S. (presented 2017, June). Towards Researcher Participation in Research Information Management Systems. Presentation at Open Repositories 2017 Conference, Open Repositories, Brisbane, Australia.
  • Lee, D. J., Stvilia, B., & Wu, S. (presented 2017, March). Studying service and metadata models of research information management systems. Poster presentation at iConference 2017, iSchools, Wuhan, China.
  • Wu, S., Stvilia, B., & Lee, D. J. (presented 2016, October). Exploring researchers’ participation in online research identity management systems. Poster presentation at 2016 Annual Meeting of the Association for Information Science and Technology, ASIS&T.
  • Lee, D. J., Stvilia, B., & Wu, S. (presented 2016, May). Towards researcher participation in research information systems. Poster presentation at 2016 Texas Conference on Digital Libraries, Texas Conference on Digital Libraries, Austin, TX.

Team

Dr. Besiki Stvilia, Professor
Florida State University
School of Information – Florida’s iSchool
269 Louis Shores Building
142 Collegiate Loop
P.O. Box 3062100
Tallahassee, Florida 32306-2100
Email: mailto:bstvilia@fsu.edu
Web: http://myweb.fsu.edu/bstvilia/

Dr. Shuheng Wu
Assistant Professor
Graduate School of Library and Information Studies, Queens College, 65-30
Kissena Blvd., Queens, NY 11367-1597.
Email: Shuheng.Wu@qc.cuny.edu

Dr. Dong Joon Lee
Assistant Professor
University Libraries, Texas A&M University, 5000 TAMU, College Station,
Texas 77843-5000.
Email: djlee@tamu.edu

Funding

This project is supported by an OCLC/ALISE Library and Information Research Grant 32 for 2016
and a National Leadership Grant from the Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS) of the U.S. Government (grant # LG-73-16-0006-16).

The publications posted on this site reflect the findings and conclusions of the authors, and do not necessarily reflect the views of IMLS, OCLC, and ALISE.